The Empire State broadside collection

The Empire State broadside collection

Descriptive Summary

Repository: Hargrett Manuscripts
Creator: Georgia Power Company.
Title: The Empire State broadside collection
Dates: 1922-1931
Quantity: 1.4 Linear feet (1 oversized box)
Coll. Number: ms2723

Biographical/Historical Note

Besides being known as the Peach State, Georgia enjoys the nickname of the Empire State of the South. This collection hails from an advertising campaign also known as the "Empire State," created by the Georgia Power Company. Georgia Power distributed weekly window cards (poster-sized sign advertisements) using the slogan "It's Great to Be a Georgian" to encourage businesses and people to come, reside, and stay in Georgia as well as foster state pride about Georgia. The information provided on these signs was educational and concerned Georgia in some manner - usually either economically or historically. The advertisements became popular throughout the state in both urban and rural areas.


Scope and Content Note

This collection consists of 194 broadsides regarding "The Empire State" Advertising campaign of the Georgia Power company. The broadsides advertise and celebrate Georgia's history and current economy. The broadslides include statements of economic or historical facts about Georgia. The format of the broadsides does not vary much from 1921 to 1931, but the slogans change every advertisement on a weekly basis.

Broadsides #1-26 (1922) focus on economic statistics from 1921 and Georgian history and attractions. An example would be: "Romance of Tallulah / Five men operate the 108,000 horse power Tallulah power house / From this station, light, heat, and power are furnished 51 cities and towns in 25 counties of Georgia with a population of 750,000."

Broadsides #27-57 (1923) focus on economic statistics from 1922 and Georgian history and attractions. Example: "Georgia Leads in U.S. Navy / In 1922, Georgia led the Nation in furnishing her native born sons to the sea forces of this country."

Broadsides #58-85 (1924) focus on economic statistics from 1923 and Georgian historical figures. Example: "Georgia Clay / More than $7,000,000 is brought into this State annually from the sale of commercial articles manufactured from Georgia clay."

Broadsides #86-101 (1925) focus on economic statistics from 1924 and Georgian history, places, people, and crops. Example: "Selling Cane Syrup to the World / Cairo, Ga., is the largest producing shipping point for pure cane syrup in America. In 1924 Georgia produced 3,796,875 gallons."

Broadsides #102-125 (1926) focus on economic statistics from 1925 and Georgian history, places, people, and crops. Example: "A Steamboat operated on the Savannah River 17 years before Fulton launched his 'Clermont' on the Hudson in N.Y."

Broadsides #126-142 (1927) focus on economic statistics from 1926, Georgian people (famous, military, etc), and Georgian places and crops. Example: "Wintering in Georgia / Ideal climatic conditions, magnificient hotels, golf courses, bathing facilities, and other attractions combine to make Central and South Georgia among the most popular winter resorts of the country."

Broadsides # 143-159 (1928) focus on economic statistics from 1926 and 1927 and historical quotations about Georgia. Example: "Georgia's major farm products for 1927 were valued at $250, 685,000, an increase of more than 18 per cent over 1926. Georgia's crop values for 1927 ranked fifteenth in the United States."

Broadsides # 160-177 (1929) focus on economic statistics from 1928, Georgia history, current Georgian attractions, and historical quotations about Georgia and its crops. Example: "King Cotton / Georgia's 1,020,000 bale cotton crop for 1928 is valued at $100,000,000. A large part of it will be made into cloth and tire fabric in Georgia mills."

Broadsides #178-188 (1930) focus on economic statistics from 1929 and early Georgian history. Example: "Georgia Agriculture / The total value of Georgia's farm products was $262, 254,000 in 1929, an increase of $29,000,000 over the total of the previous year."

Broadsides # 189-193 (1931) focus on 18th century Georgian history. Example: "Georgia's Last Trustees / The trustees of Georgia held their last meeting April 19, 1752, and Georgia came under direct control of Great Britain. Only six of the original 72 trustees were then living."

Broadsides #194-196 (misc undated) contain three broadsides that refer to Atlanta attractions, such as Druid Hills and Georgia Tech.


Arrangement

Arranged in chronological order.


Index Terms

Broadsides (notices).
Broadsides--Georgia--Specimens.
Georgia Power Company. -- History
Georgia--Economic conditions--20th century.
Georgia--History--20th century.

Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

The Empire State broadside collection, MS 2723. Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, The University of Georgia Libraries.


Series Descriptions and Folder Listing

 
OS Box
1#1-26, 1922
 
#27-57, 1923
 
#58-85, 1924
 
#86-101, 1925
 
#102-125, 1926
 
#126-142, 1927
 
#143-159, 1928
 
#160-177, 1929
 
#178-188, 1930
 
#189-193, 1931
 
#194-196