Francis Marion Coker papers

Francis Marion Coker papers

Descriptive Summary

Repository: Hargrett Manuscripts
Creator: Coker, Francis Marion, 1827-1905
Title: Francis Marion Coker papers
Dates: 1861-1866
Quantity: 0.4 Linear feet (I document box)
Coll. Number: ms15

Biographical/Historical Note

Francis Marion Coker (1827-1905), planter, banker, and Confederate soldier, born in Elbert County, Georgia.


Scope and Content Note

The collection consists mainly of detailed correspondence from Francis Marion Coker to his wife, Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker, during his service as a Confederate soldier from 1861-1865. Includes descriptions of camp life, prices, food, clothing, marches, sickness, and foreign intervention. Describes the Seven Days Battle before Richmond and discusses camp politics, conduct of officers and doctors. Comments on fighting around Fredericksburg and the battlefield, Petersburg, Sherman and the march through Georgia. Also contains some correspondence from Sallie Coker to Francis Coker and a few business letters.


Arrangement

Arranged at item level in chronological order.


Index Terms

Coker, Sarah Alice Reid
Confederate States of America. Army.
Fredericksburg, Battle of, Fredericksburg, Va., 1862.
Georgia--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Campaigns.
Petersburg Crater, Battle of, Va., 1864.
Richmond (Va.)
Seven Days' Battles, Va., 1862.
Sherman's March to the Sea.
Soldiers--Georgia.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Officers.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Participation, Foreign.
United States--History--Civil War, 1861-1865.
Virginia--History--Civil War, 1861-1865--Campaigns.

General Notes

Also known as: Florence Hodgson Heidler collection.

Cataloged as part of the Georgia Archives and Manuscripts Automated Access Project: A Special Collections Gateway Program of the University Center in Georgia.

This collection has been digitized and is available online as part of America's Turning Point: Documenting the Civil War Experience in Georgia.


Administrative Information

Preferred Citation

Frances Marion Coker papers. MS 15. Hargrett Rare Book and Manuscript Library, University of Georgia Libraries.


Series Descriptions and Folder Listing

 
BoxFolder
11Correspondence, 1861 View online.
Letter from: W. B. C. Coker, (Camp Cutts, 1 mile east of Manassas Junction, Va.), to: Brother, July 28, 1861
(On "patriotic stationery") Account of Bull Run (1st Manassas) Request medicine & mail--Tells of food in camps & possibility of advancement.
Letter from: A. L. Cutts, (Camp near Centerville, Va.), to: F. M. Coker, Americus, Ga., November 5, 1861
Military matters.
 
2Correspondence, 1862 February-May View online.
Letter from: W. B. C. Coker, to: F. M. Coker, Americus, Ga., February 13, 1862
Family & business matters.
Letter from: A. J. Coker (Camp Davis near Guyton P. O., Ga.), to: F. M. Coker, March 28, 1862
Refusing to ask for a transfer from Infantry to Artillery to be with other brothers.
Letter from: L. Norvell, Cashier Farmers Bank of Va. (Lynchburg), to: F. M. Coker, Americus, Ga., March 29, 1862
Asking Coker to recommend someone to collect bills for them.
Letter from: F. M. Coker, (Richmond, Sunday evening), to: Wife, Americus, Ga [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 6, 1862
Military affairs, rumors about troop movements.
Letter from: F. M. Coker, (Richmond, Va.), to: Wife, Americus, Ga [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 16, 1862
Describing trip from Louisa Court House to Richmond. Tells of sickness in camp. Names officers in Company B.
Letter from: F. M. Coker, (Camp Winder, near Richmond), to: J. W. Trylow, Esq. (Furlow?), April 20, 1862
Tells of dividing Company B, into B & C and names officers Complains of weather. Predicts huge battle at Yorktown and then peace.
Letter from: F. M. Coker, (Camp Winder, near Richmond), to: Wife, Americus, Ga [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 22, 1862
Says they are waiting for guns. Lists his Mess and tells a little about camp life. Discusses how to control the children. Business Military.
Letter from: F. M. Coker, Camp Winder, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 27, 1862
Description of cemetery at Richmond. About company elections. Military affairs. Clothes. Sickness in camp.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Winder, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 29, 1862
Answering her questions about camp life, clothes, food, etc. Prices of food in Richmond. Hanging of a spy. Federals have Mississippi.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Lee near Richmond), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 5, 1862
Moved 1 mile further from Richmond & went into tents. Camp Winder made hospital. Brother William arrives quite ill. [letter torn]
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Lee, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 14, 1862
Thanking for box; food & liquor situation prices. Guard duty on Yankee prisoners. Illness & death in camp. Optimism on impossibility of South's being conquered. Merrimac.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Lee, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 15, 1862
Yankee gunboats up the James. Monitor & Ironclads. Obstructions in channel. Description of situation in Richmond. Description of surrounding countryside. Fire in Richmond, Disease in army.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Lee, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 17, 1862 (Saturday morning)
In reply to one from her--health of men in camp. Casualties, weather, mail, food. Wants a pistol & some clean collars.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Lee, near Richmond, to: Mrs. Clayton, May 18, 1862
About Sparks Clayton, her son, who has enlisted--has had the mumps, but is nearly well. Expects a big battle soon which will "settle the squabble". Richmond is safe, he thinks.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Lee, near Richmond), to: Wife, Americus, GA [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 20, 1862
He "embraces the opportunity" to send her a letter but he'd rather embrace her! News of friends, health, legal matters about settling an estate. Blames sickness of men on "filthy camp". Predicts a battle.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Lee, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 24, 1862
He is well. Fighting has started. They may have to retreat.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Redoubt No. 4, near Richmond), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 26, 1862
Moved 5 miles. Armed & ready to fight. Isn't feeling well. Still sickness among men. Has got a horse. Answers questions in her letters. Tells what he spend $150 on. He gets $100/ month. Expects a battle soon. Hopes God will open the eyes of the North and "let us attend to our own business in our own way".
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Artillery, near Richmond), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 31, 1862
He is ill--received the pistol & collars. Hopes he can get Sparks Clayton discharged soon--hasn't fought yet. Rumors of skirmishing.
 
3Correspondence, 1862 June-October View online.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 1, 1862
Describes an attack on Federal. His section is not as yet involved, may get into it. Saw his brother, Will, who is fine. He thinks he, himself, may have jaundice, but is better.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 3, 1862
Section is ready to fight. General Jason E. Johson wounded. Estimate of killed and wounded. He regrets to hear his children have scarlet fever. Hopes it will be mild. "We have yet 200,000 good troops and blood like water will flow before Richmond is surrendered."
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 4, 1862
Still waiting. Raining--Saw Will again. Describes wounded--says ladies have come to help nurse. Flies are terrible. Her letters are delayed. How are children. Please get some coffee. What to do about the stock at home. Doesn't think the war will last long. News of friends. Says he encloses letter taken from body of dead Yankee, [letter not here]
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 7, 1862
Tells of deaths in Company. He has Jaundice, but is better. Saw brother Will, and he was in the fight.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 8, 1862
Got her letters--will send his by people coming home on furlough. Glad children are better--hopes she doesn't take it- (scarlet fever) Wishes he could be there to help her. Don't send money. People in Richmond starving--quotes prices.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 13, 1862
Got her letter, is she ill? Has the baby had it yet--she's so young. He wishes he were there--worried about his letters not getting there. He's Still sick but thinks he may be improving. Friends in his company who have been sick are better but many have died. Reports of Army's movements. Is sending some things Home.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 15, 1862
Got her letter--sends his by friend. Got letter from Woodson who says she is sick from a cold. Speaks of battle on the Chickahominy. Paragraph about men in Americus who have not enlisted. Sparks Clayton was discharged and will be home in a few days.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 16, 1862
Sends this letter by Sparks. He sends her a paper with details of the fight. He has not received any newspapers from her, although she has sent them. His Faith in Foreign intervention has grown weak.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 19, 1862
Got her letter--Moralizes on subject of why some people get furloughs and some don't . Hopes that baby is better. Writes about supplies Yankess left when they were forced to retreat from a camp [this letter incomplete]
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Artillery, near Richmond, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 24, 1862
Got her letters--glad the baby had the fever so lightly. Nobody knows how long this War will last. If France & England would recognize the Confederacy the Yankess would succumb. New Englanders want to prolong War--reasons: Slaves and profiteering. Doubts that Foreign intervention will come about--blames Seward for this. South is outnumbered and never did have the manufaturers, if we win it will be a miracle. "But then it must and will be done."
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 29, 1862
Seven days battle before Richmond. A very interesting running account of the battle, description troop movements, rumors, casualties, prisoners, etc. He received a trunk from her and lists contents.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 3, 1862
Resumes his account of battle, describing the terrain, casualties, movements of troops, prisoners, wounded, etc.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 12, 1862
Received her letters, cannot understand why she doesn't get his. General Lee has cancelled all furloughs. Thinks the battles cost the Federal Government 50 MIllion dollars! Lists the guns, etc.--Captured from Yankees.
Letter from: C. P. Crawford (In camp), to: Captain F. M. Coker, July 19, 1862
Recommendations for promotions to Sargeants and Corporals.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 20, 1862
Tells of consolidation of Companies B & C, He is Captain. If the men do not want him as captain he will resign for the good of the company and come home to her.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 26, 1862
He resigned and the company had an election and elected Patterson. He was then offered a position on Col. Cutts staff. He cannot decide what to do. Wants to come home, but knows his country needs him and it is his duty to stay--he will decide & write her soon.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (camp near Richmond), to: J. J. Harris, Esq., Americus, Ga., July 31, 1862
Letter dealing with the consolidation of the two companies B and C
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 31, 1862
Reassures her as to his love and continual faithfulness. Has not yet decided whether to accept Col. Cutts offer of an adjutancy.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 1, 1862
A covering letter for the letter to Harris, which he tells her not to deliver until he tells her to. He encloses the note to him from Crawford and tells her to save it.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp near Richmond), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 11, 1862
Family and business matters. He has evidently decided to accept the Adgt. position. Gunboats on the James. "Stonewall" has whipped Pope in the Valley.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Headquarters Sumter Artillery near Manchester.), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 15, 1862
He wants her to come to see him, but can find nowhere for her to stay. Hopes to get a furlough before the winter. Business prices there.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp above Richmond), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 20, 1862
On way to join Stonewall.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Headquarters Sumter Artillery, Camp near Hanover Junction, VA.), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 23, 1862
His Batn going to join Jackson. The whole army almost is with him. Pope said to be retreating. He thinks the war might end this winter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Frederick City, Maryland), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 8, 1862
Describes Battlefield of 29th & 30th. Unburied Yankees. Tells her, her brother is dead, John David Johnson. "He fell nobly, bravely. ... as, nobly as man can die." [attached a blank slip from a Yankee Diary] Says he's on the way to Hagerstown, Maryland. She'll probally not hear for some time.
 
4Correspondence, 1862 October-December View online.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Headquarters, Sumter Artillery, 11 Ga. Batn. near Winchester), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 1, 1862
He's been away six months today. In last six weeks he has travelled several hundred miles, fought three or four battles. Wants his clothes sent for winter. Lists them. Speaks of friends in camp.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Headquarters Sumter Artillery Batn Nineveh, Va.), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 5, 1862
A most poetic description of the Fall of the year. Visited a cave near camp. Describes the trip through Maryland and treatment by the people. He refers to Yankees as "the scum of God's whole earth", their four artillery batteries are to be merged into three. Hopes to get a furlough in winter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Ninevah, VA.), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 13, 1862
Things have been quiet for 2 weeks. He has a good tent, but thousands have none and weather is wet and cold and windy. Talk of Col. Cutts resigning then no telling what will become of the Batn.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Ninevah, VA., to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 28, 1862
Col. Cutts is determined to resign. Two men were sent to Ga. to buy horses. He had hoped to be one, but wasn't. Doesn't see any chance of coming now. No prospect of a fight. Is sending her some money and a pair of shoes. Cutts resignation will be accepted he believes [letter incomplete]
Letter from: Mat. A. Coker (Americus, Ga), to: F. M. Coker (brother), November 5, 1862
She and their mother went to Marietta to see her uncle who was quite ill. Wants him to tell Furlow* to repay some money they had to get to go. Rest of letters asks for money. *Furlow attends to Coker's business for him--an agent
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (camp near Culpepper C. H., VA.), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 5, 1862
Describes trip down to Culpepper, about ambitions, quotes Napoleon's letter to Josephine, "Pride goeth before a Fall" Wants Mr. Furlow to find and hire a Negro servant for him
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Culpepper C. House), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 10, 1862
He is well, his clothes are fairly warm, advises her not to buy pork until Christmas, it'll be cheaper then. Why did she shingle her hair, was it falling out? He doubts that he can get furlough. A fight is going on some 8 miles north.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Culpepper C. H. House, Va.), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 10, 1862
The boy who had been cooking for some of them ran away- he has to cook for himself now, but it's better and cleaner than before. It has been snowing and icicles hang from the tent. Think there'll soon be a fight. Candles cost .50¢
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Culpepper C. H. House, Va., to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 15, 1862
Instructs her to pay sister Matt what is due her. His clothes very well.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Culpepper C. H. House, Va., to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 19, 1862
Orders received to march. Letter is on a page ruled for a report. Business affairs.
Letter from: H. A. MacDonald, to: F. M. C[oker], November 20, 1862
If he comes through Richmond and Petersburg any time soon on furlough to home, please see if he can locate her trunk lost there. The MacDonald's two sons were killed. She hopes the youngest will not have to go to war.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp near Fredericksburg, Va.), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 25, 1862
Now encamped four miles south of Fredericksburg. Longstreet's Corps, are here also. The two armies (Yankee & Confederate) are only divided now by the Rappahannock River. His battery is on banks to fire on Gunboats should they come up the river. Soldiers need shoes & clothing. He is sick.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp near Fredericksburg, Va., to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 2, 1862
Eight months have passed since they parted. Have had no fight, and no immediate prospect of any. Desires to be home, of which he dreams, but doesn't think he'll be home this winter. "Would not sacrifice honour or principle or play the hypocrite to leave" and General Lee more strict on furloughs. He is still sick.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp near Fredericksburg, Va., to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 5, 1862
More about sister Matt's note. Pay her. Saw brother Will, he needs everything in the way of clothes. Brother Will is now chaplain of the Regiment. Stonewall's army has come down out of the valley and is 20 miles away. We are in sight of the Yankees across the river. Both sides throwing up breastworks but no signs of an immediate battle.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp near Fredericksburg, Va), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 7, 1862
Very cold. Had to melt ink before he could write. His tent mate stays drunk all the time. No one person is in charge of the Battallion. The doctors get liquor for the sick and drink it themselves. Gambling, drinking and other miscondcut is life. Family news.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp near Fredericksburg, Va., to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 8, 1862
Still cold. No news, no prospect of a fight. Coffee all gone. Thinks they might be here all winter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp near Fredericksburg, Va., to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 11, 1862
Scrap of paper enclosed in letter [62] saying he got her letter and key to trunk.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp near Fredericksburg, Va., to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 11, 1862
Trunk came, but no letter from her, nor key to trunk, [see above NO. 61 ] The enemy has attacked, trying to cross river. Got trunk open and lists contents. Sends message to Mrs. Mac-Donald [see NO. 55] that he will do what he can about the trunk if he ever gets a furlough home. Doubts if he will.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp 5 miles West of Fredericksburg, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 16, 1862
Refers to Burnside as the "3rd. Napoleon". Description of Confederate and Yankee positions. Account of attack. Confederate replied with artillery fire. Skirmishes. Two attacks on either side of his position. He describes them very graphically. Description of Fredericksburg. Five days fighting. Personal business affairs.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp 5 miles West of Fredericksburg, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 18, 1862
Quiet and cold. He went to look at the Battlefield-Dead. Breastwork made of human bodies, Fredericksburg a wreck---full of dead Yankees.
Letter from: S. A. J. C. (wife) [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], December 28, 1862
Personal and family matters, Christmas at home very dull. She hopes he will be sent to Savannah.
 
5Correspondence, 1863 January-August 7 View online.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood, VA.), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], January 3, 1863
He was not injured in the battle but was near the place where Tom Cobb was killed [General T. R. R. Cobb] He wishes he could see little India and hear her try to talk. Rumors of a victory for Bragg in the West.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Albany), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], January 5, 1863
He has evidently been home--he speaks of thinkgs he forgot. Very short note.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], January 8, 1863
His trunk came, but all his food had been stolen. However, he is not hungry--they have a little cabbage and some turnips.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 22, 1863
[somehow between the letter above (68) and this one, he got to South Carolina and is now back in Virginia. I think he had a furlough] Says his last letter written in Kingsville S. C. where they had to lie over. They are travelling by train and he had several accidents. Got to Petersburg where he went to the Theatre. Show was poor, there were several fights among the audience. Snowing-- a foot deep.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 26, 1863
Still cold. Snow deep. Roads impassable, operations suspended. Caught his first louse on himself today, [he has been home, he refers to it] He has a bad cold and fever. The boys are having snow battles.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 28, 1863
The children have measels. Weather very wet, water in his tent. Jackson's and part of Longstreet's corps. are still around Fredericksburg.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 3, 1863
A love letter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 9, 1863
Personal. It is her 27th birthday. He has "no birthday present" for her except his heart, love and devotion.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 11, 1863
Snowing again. He sends her some writing paper and some shoe polish and a newspaper. If the roads would get dry they could go over and whip "fighting Joe Hooker" out of his boots!
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 18, 1863
Troops have moved up to Fredericksburg, "fighting Joe Hooker " thinks he can wipe out Robert E. Lee, Esq.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 19, 1863
Were sent back to camp. Not needed yet. Threatened with a Calvary Raid. Snowing again. They get bread, bacon, and some sugar, out of which they make syrup. Don't send a big box of food--you'll probally need it worse there. Six inches of snow, major Pelham killed. Suggests she wean the baby, since she is 18 months old.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 21, 1863
"Subsitutes and discharges seem to be the order of the day, while patriotism is dissolving into thin air." Snowed heavily and now is raining. Boys catch snow birds, call them "confederate gobblers".
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 27, 1863
Discussion of prices. Tells her to take care of her crockery and knives and forks for no more is to be had for less than a fortune. Expects another campaign as soon as warm weather comes.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 29, 1863
Discussion of sustitutes and people who don't fight. He hears small pox is in Americus she must not leave the yard nor let the children play with anyone. If they get it wire him at once. The army is preparing to move. May go to Maryland.
Letter from: Sallie (wife) [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, to: F. M. C[oker], April 1, 1863
It has been a year since he left to go to war and except for his one month's furlough she has not seen him. She misses him, she wishes he would get a substitute, etc.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 1, 1863
A year ago he left her for war--he is depressed--philosophizes on the futility and horror of war. Wonders if he will ever see her again. Sees no hope for peace. Army hasn't moved yet, due to bad weather.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp Pinewood, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 6, 1863
Answers questions in her letters just received. He is tolerable comfortable, at least his tent is dry. He flatly refuses to hire a substitute. "I would sacrifice anything but honour and principle to be with you." [letter unsigned] continued in next]
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 7, 1863
Failed to get letter off, so adds more. They haven't much food, as rations have been cut. Tells her to take care of her provisions. Letter paper is $4 or $5 a quire now. Weather and roads still bad. The Army seems to be getting ready to move as soon as roads dry out. Adds a P. S. to say that a friend tried to buy his wife a bonnet in Richmond and they cost $100 to $150.
Letter from: J. W. Furlow, (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], April 8, 1863
Statement of moneys collected for Mr. Coker. Investments, business letter. He considers the outlook very gloomy.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 9, 1863
As war continues, things will get worse. Don't send any more clothes. He has finally got a horse. Expecting to move to Fredericksburg in two or three days. With a battle to follow, he believes.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 22, 1863
Weather warmer, he is sending home some winter bedclothes. Says he's had some yeast which he apparently never saw before. Makes elegant bread with only flour and water! things look brighter to him now. Batallion news.
Letter from: W. B. C. Coker (Thunder Bolt Battery), to: Brother, April 24, 1863
Yankees making strong demonstrations on coast near Charleston. News of their location. Possible they may go to Tennessee. Diatribe against Yankees burning and destroying. Business and money matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood VA), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 25, 1863
Don't send food--keep what you have, you will need it later. Salt is about $50 a sack. He fears, from her letter, that Woodson is dead. War news in the West is bad.
Letter from: Thomas D. Speer, (Sumter County GA), to: F. M. C[oker], April 27, 1863
Business letter--considers land a better investment than Negroes or bonds. Urges him to get a substitute and come home to attend to his business--one can be hired for $3,000 to $5,000.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp Pinewood), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 29, 1863
Ready to move into battle, tells her where he has left his trunk in case anything happens to him.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp near Fredericksburg), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 8, 1863
Battle is over, describes destruction of Hookers' Hqs. at Chancellorsville. Yankees had to abandon all, so Confederates now are "rigged out" with new clothes, supplies and guns.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Fredericksburg Heights), to: Furlow, May 13, 1863
Encloses list of notes he has bought with instructions to Furlow about handling them. Mentions war, especially death of General Jackson.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Fredericksburg Heights), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 19, 1863
A Major Lave put in command of Battn. but he commands respect of no one, thus F. M. C. fears he must dissolve connection with him and to do this must leave the Battn. Trying to get a transfer, for health reasons, also.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Fredericksburg Heights, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 29, 1863
Brother Jackson dead [typhoid fever]. Died in hospital in Richmond, and letter deals with this.
Letter from: W. B. C. C., (Thunder Bolt Battery), to: F. M. C[oker], May 29, 1863
Business letter
Letter from: John Coker, (Camp Thunder Bolt Battery near Savannah), to: F. M. C. (brother) [F. M. Coker], May 30, 1863
A business letter
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Fredericksburg Heights, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 31, 1863
Rumor Grant fell back at Vicksburg. Hasn't heard of transfer and if he doesn't he will make an effort to resign. Battn. may be turned into calvary. Expects another conflict soon.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Fredericksburg Heights, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 2, 1863
Hopes a transfer will go through--no news yet. Is depressed over the war--says the South resources are failing rapidly. His health is poor--he feels only contempt for his "Boss" News has just come that the Battn. is to be attached to A. P. Hills' Corps.
Letter from: John m. Coker, (Camp Thunderbolt Battery, Savannah, Ga.), to: F. M. C[oker], June 4, 1863
A business letter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (camp near Fredericksburg), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 8, 1863
He has been sick but is better. Tells of friends in Battn. who are sick. He hears the Yankees have fallen back to cover Washington. Describes the three Army Corps. Longstreets' Ewells' and Hills'. Has no hopes of transfer.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp near Fredericksburg, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 9, 1863
A short note. No news of the transfer. No fight yet.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Camp near Fredericksburg, to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 11, 1863
Health is improving and no news of transfer. Army has been in line of battle six days, sleeping in field.
Letter from: S. C. (wife) [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus, GA), to: F. M. C[oker], June 13, 1863
She's worried about him--his health--suggests cayenne pepper dissolved in water as a remedy.
Letter from: J. M. Coker, (Camp Thunderbolt Battery, Savannah, Ga), to: F. M. C[oker], June 14, 1863
Money and who owes who for whiskey, etc. Business letter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (near Camp Fredericksburg), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 14, 1863
No news. Many things in his present position "mortify and wound" him. Wishes he could be with her at the commencement exercises. Bishop Pierce is to preach she says. Army will probally move in a day or two.
Letter from: S. C. (wife) [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus, Ga), to: F. M. C[oker], June 15, 1863
Col. Speer can get a substitute for him. She worried constantly about his health. She will not go to commencement although Mrs. Collier is there for the occasion.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 16, 1863
She is glad his health is better but worries about the exposure. Maybe there will soon be news of transfer. The baby's eyes are still crossed since her illness. Crops are looking well and promising.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 19, 1863
No news--Commencement over. Some friends have married. Finger still sore. Does he need clothes? Everybody well.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 21, 1863
So glad his health is better. Worries about the Army's moving and not being able to hear from him. She wants to come see him if the Army gets settled again. Crops look good.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 23, 1863
She gathers from his letter he is going to Maryland and Pennsylvania and she dreads that because she won't hear from him for a while. She prays for him constantly and worries about his health. Wheat is $5 a bushel.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, Ga., to: F. M. C[oker], June 26, 1863
She heard, via Col Cutts, that maybe F. M. C. had been transferred to Georgia. She and two friends went bathing in Woodson's pool. So nice!
Letter from: D. Collier, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 29, 1863
A "bread and butter" letter. Mrs. Collier had been there for Commencement.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], 1863
Accounts, R. R. Rees, Sumter Artillery Battn.
 
6Correspondence, 1863 July 5-1864 January 24 View online.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], July 5, 1863
He got his transfer and was headed for Sharpsburg, MD., when she last heard. She hopes he can come by home soon. Maybe on the 11 o'clock train today [he didn't]--Evening--She is sick with disappointment. Maybe he'll come tomorrow. Neighborhood news.
Letter from: J. S. Geoyner, (Camp near Culpepper C. H. VA.), to: F. M. C[oker], July 26, 1863
Concerning four unidentified objects.
Letter from: W. B. Tinsley, (Bank of Savannah), to: F. M. C[oker], August 6, 1863
Business letter.
Letter from: Benjamin F. Johnson (sallie's brother), (Eatonton), to: F. M. C[oker], August 7, 1863
Business letter, Can't get some things Mr. Coker wanted--could get Col Speer's wheat.
Letter from: Thomas A. Brown, (Talbatton, Ga.), to: W. R. Matthews, Richmond Va., August 10, 1863
Introducing Mr. Coker and recommending him for offices of Post Q. Master of the 3rd Congressional District of Ga. Mr. C. has been agent of the Bank of Savannah in Americus for years and is well qualified.
Letter from: T. A. Brown, to: F. M. C[oker], August 11, 1863
He has heard that the Q Master has already been appointed--not to F. M. C.
Letter from: Chas. M Peck, LT. Adjt., (Headquarters of Conscription, Macon), to: LT. F. M. C[oker], September 2, 1863
Special Orders, No. 544 LT. Coker is assigned to duty as EN-rolling Officer for 1st Cong. Dist. of Ga. with Headquarters in Savannah.
Letter from: H. McDaniel, to: F. M. Coker, Americus, Ga., September 5, 1863
Business letter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 18, 1863
Sorry to hear Mattie is sick. He can't get home anytime soon. He's only commissioned officer there. Hopes she can come see him soon although she won't like his boarding house. He tried to find her a dress. Only one was black alpaca--would she like it? Found some black silk ½ yard wide at $35 a yard. More about prices. Hopes war will soon be over.
Letter from: Lucius R. [letter torn], (Sumter Artillery Battn. Near Orange C. H. VA), to: F. M. C[oker], September 28, 1863
Henry Hill paid him the money he (Hill) owed Coker. What shall he do with it? Dangerous to send through mail. We are in full view of Yanks but doesn't think ther'll be a fight.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Savannah), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 26, 1863
Short note. Is sending Alpaca. Family matters. She can take a music teacher to board if she wants to.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Savannah, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 29, 1863
Family matters. Wants her to come visit him. Prices in Savannah. Short letter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 2, 1863
Prices in Savannah. Thread is $1.75 to $2.00 per spool, Everything will go higher, he feels. Wilmington is the only Port where they can run the blockade now.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 4, 1863
Family affairs--the baby has chills. She must obey the doctor and take medicine herself. Can't find her any shoes. Little cloth ones are $18 a pair. Prices of clothes.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Savannah), to: Wife [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 8, 1863
Family matters. Has bought India a pair of little leather shoes for $14. He may come home in a week or so.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Savannah), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 9, 1863
Short note. Is sending the paper measure of India's shoes. Will they fit? He has a cold.
Letter from: W. B. Coker, (Thunderbolt), to: F. M. C[oker], October 9, 1863
Is just out of hospital. Has fever. John is better. He hears someone told Sallie he was drunk. He says he wasn't and can prove it! [on top of letter] P. S. F. M. C. to Sallie--Please write me the facts.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Savannah, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 21, 1863
He has just returned from visit home. Hopes she can come soon and hates for her to have to change trains in Macon and wait there for two hours by herself.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Savannah, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 24, 1863
Prices--buying and selling. Got some money owed him and invested it in thread, pins, etc. for sale.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Eng.'s Office 1st Cong. Dist., GA (Savannah)), to: S.C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 27, 1863
Very busy. Tells her what to do or have done. What to buy and/or swap. What to do on the plantation.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Eng.'s Office 1st Cong. Dist., GA (Savannah), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 28, 1863
Asks about a slave for sale. Family affairs.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Eng.'s Office 1st Cong. Dist., GA (Savannah), to: Captain W. W. Gordon, November 12, 1863
[certified copy] Report of a case of a soldier failing to report after a 30 day leave. He was arrested, but released without Coker's orders.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Savannah), to: Captain W. W. Gordan, November 18, 1863
More about the same case.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Savannah, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 23, 1863
Has just returned from another trip. Had stopped off in Macon. She wanted her shawl dyed, but they couldn't dye it any color but black. News of friends.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 6, 1863
Family matters. He can get her a hat. Also a hair nett. Prices
 
7Correspondence, 1864 January-June View online.
Letter from: Major Charles J. Harris, (Headquarters of Conscription, Macon, Ga), to: F. M. Coker, January 20, 1864
(Extract) - Special orders telling Lr. Coker who he is to relieve.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Savannah), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], January 26, 1864
Just arrived in Savannah to take over new duties. Philosophizes about himself. Talks of her fears for him in Savannah because he "should be expossed to temptations and allurements that might seduce me from the paths of virtue, and open up a field of vice and immortaility."
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 1, 1864
General news. Not too well. Received $300 from Col. Speer to buy calico.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Savannah), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 2, 1864
Bought calico--$5 and $7 a yard. Col. Speer's money wouldn't pass. Also included some seeds in package.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Savannah, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 9, 1864
General family matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Savannah, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 12, 1864
General family news. Tells her when she comes to Savannah not to leave keys to meat house but to leave enough meat for those remaining. He has his "reasons for this."
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (savannah), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 13, 1864
Wife to rent room to "lady & Gent, servant and 2 children" $300--General family matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Savannah, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 17, 1864
General family matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Savannah, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 19, 1864
General matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Savannah), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 27, 1864
French calico and gingham at $8 a yard. Started selling calfskins for $150--offered $1200 a dozen. Flour $140 a sack.
Letter from: Q. D. SMith, (Statesboro), to: F. M. [Coker], March 2, 1864
Asks for detail of 8 or 10 men to help bring conscripts to Savannah "as some goes so far as to say they will resist the law with arms"
Letter from: E. E., March 4, 1864
List of notes returned by Lt. F. M. Coker, Agent Bank of Savannah.
Letter from: W. C. Daniels, (Savannah), to: W. C. O'Driscoll, March 5, 1864
Note saying collaterals delivered to Lt. Coker for above notes.
Letter from: Jason W. Furlow, (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], March 5, 1864
Business matters.
Letter from: W. L. Johnston, (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], March 10, 1864
Business details on notes.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Griffin), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 23, 1864
Has been sent to Griffin--tells of trip there. He is displeased with charge but as long as she is pleased it matters little.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Griffin, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 9, 1864
Observed fast day "yesterday". General matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Griffin, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 12, 1864
She has been quite sick. General family matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Griffin, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 13, 1864
Just received orders to be sent to Atlanta--tells this
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Atlanta), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 25, 1864
Found place to board at $300 a month each. Later found another place cheaper but could not be furnished with room or bed. Of Atlanta he says, "A more Godforsaken place I reckon is not in the Confederacy this side of Richmond." He hopes to set things straight.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Head quarters Con. 8 District Atlanta), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], April 29, 1864
Received news to go to front, i. e. to his command but he believes it must be a mistake as he has no command! Expects orders and when arrive will investigate fully.
Receipt from Southern Express Co., (Americus), May 9, 1864
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], May 16, 1864
Heard he was sick. Seven years tomorrow they married--talks of those years. Tells him if Richmond must fall, for him To be captured rather than killed.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker] (Augusta) to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 27, 1864
Returning from home to Richmond. Mrs. Cutts accompanying him for visit with husband. General news.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Charlotte, N. C.), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], May 29, 1864
Stopped here shortly on way to Richmond. He has had very little trouble getting Mrs. Cutts along although he has to tell one or two "white stories". Has heard Sherman repulsed Stephenson And Hindman's Division at Dallas--feels very solicitous.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Richmond), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 3, 1864
Georgians are falling thick and fast. Tells of battles going on--hears cannonading of Richmond in distance. News of friends and Battn. Rumor Beauregard prevented Grant and Butler from uniting.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Battlefield Gaines Mil1), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 7, 1864
Has never heard from his application. Scarcely can find horses--5 bringing $3 to $5,000. No regular engagement for 3 days--lines are only 150 yards apart. Must keep heads down or get them shot off! Everybody sure of victory.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Battlefield, Gaines Farm), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 10, 1864
Glad to hear Col Harris objected to preaching to the thieves and murderers who are caged at Anderson. Says, too, "impossible to make Christians out of Yankees". Skirmish lines in places not 20 steps apart. Believes Grant will seek to fight from Southside rather than present position.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Camp 6 miles below Richmond), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 17, 1864
He is Adjt. of the Division. Philosophizes on life. Grant's whereabouts not know but main position of his army is on the "southside". F. M. C. thinks Grant will try to take Petersburg, hold on to line of Confederate communications and while he fights Confederates try to starve them. General Early and portion of Ewell's troops have gone to Washington, in hopes of destroying city, since Yankees (troops) are withdrawn.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 19, 1864
Grant has surrounded city and has made several assaults but generally has been repulsed. Confederates captured 1,000 more prisoners.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg Va.), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 20, 1864
His birthday. He still has genuine coffee and whenever he drinks it, wishes she had some. Night before heard chimes for the first time and describes them. Tells of woman and child in Petersburg who watched troops and found husband and father they had not seen in 2 years. Describes position and skirmishes.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, Va., to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 24, 1864
Gives detailed description of plans for battle taking place as by the time she gets letter it will have been either successful or unsuccessful. He fears plans will miscarry (HE was on the front lines but ordered back to meet Mrs. Cutts who is going to spend a few days with the Col.) Has brillant success in battle 2 days prior, tells of results. Grant has operated against Richmond with not less than 275,000 men while Confederates had no more than 90,000. Talksof mutual friends he has seen.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, Va., to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], June 26, 1864
Attack failed--incompetency of General' s--Stonewalls nearly all dead. Confederate Army at every point unable to cope with enemy--they're outnumbered 3 to 1. Yankees continue shelling city. Several close friends have been killed or wounded.
 
8Correspondence, 1864 July-October 1864 View online.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Dunlop's Farm near Petersburg), to: J. W. Furlow, Esq. Americus, Ga, July 4, 1864
The army is entrenched near Petersburg fighting every day for 17 days without relief; are expecting a combined assault. Gives positions of other parts of army. Petersburg is being "knocked to pieces"
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Dunlop's Farm near Petersburg), to: J. W. Furlow, Americus, Ga., July 4, 1864
Business letter, enclosed in letter above.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Dunlop's Farm near Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 4, 1864
Are waiting for grand assault. Description of fighting. Hasn't heard from her in 3 weeks. Tells of troop movements and a friend's wounds.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Dunlop's Farm near Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 5, 1864
Encloses above letter. He is at headquarters without much to do. Has been reading Byron. Has received letter form her. John has been badly wounded he infers. Evidently a letter telling of it has miscarried. Hard fight by Hardee's Corps. Will and Tink may also be wounded. Sees no chance of a fight here.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 9, 1864
Hasn't heard from her since June 15. Tells her of friends killed and wounded. Rumors of army movements and achievements all of which he doubts. R. Roads and telegraphs closed. Mail all delayed.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 10, 1864
Has arranged to send Lt. Rees' body home. Both armies entrenched before Petersburg. No rain for 40 days. Mail communications are cut.
Letter from: Albert Rees, (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], July 14, 1864
A letter of thanks for attending to the body of his son, Lt. Rees.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Dunlop Farm (near Petersburg)), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 16, 1864
A year ago he was leaving the army of Va., now he is back In Va. fighting again. Sunday July 17--Had the day off and went to see about Mrs. McD's trunk. Found it and shipped it to Georgia. Still in trenches.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Dunlop Farm (near Petersburg, VA)), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 21, 1864
Situation same there. Discusses Johnston's replacement by Hood against Sherman in Ga. Comments on frailties of War Department and Preston Davis. Rain at Last. General Early in Virginia with captured stores and supplies.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Dunlop Farm (near Petersburg, VA.), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 22, 1864
Urges her to take care of herself and try not to worry about him. The war cannot possibly last much longer. Situation same there.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Dunlop Farm (near Petersburg, VA.), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 25, 1864
Lee is granting furloughs--he will send letter by some men coming home. Heard rumour that Grant was killed but doubts it. News of fighting in Georgia. Hopes the war will be over by Christmas.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Dunlop Farm (near Petersburg, VA.), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 30, 1864
Battle going on. Tell Mrs. Littleton her husband, Ed} was slightly wounded by a minie ball in the chest.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Dunlop Farm (near Petersburg, Va.), to: Dr. Albert Rees, July 31, 1864
Concerning the character and attainments of Lt. Lucius Rees, the doctor's son. whose killed in battle. A beautiful letter of condolence.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Dunlop Farm (near Petersburg, Va.), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 1, 1864
Received the trunk of food. Don't send anymore--she might not be able to get anything for herself and the children. Fighting again. Fought Negro troops for first time. Land mine blew up 60 or 70 men--News of wounded friends. Person and family matters.
Letter from: Albert Rees, (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], August 4, 1864
Asking assistance in settling his son's affairs.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 5, 1864
A note. He is well. Men in battn. killed or wounded. Hopes she is well.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 9, 1864
No news--it is raining but he has a tent. A love letter, after a fashion.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 13, 1864
No news. Positions of army same. Conjectures and philosophizes about the war and prospects for peace. Has received her letters telling John is worse. Letter continues for 2 days--a postscript tells of 5 to 6,000 prisoners taken "mostly foreigners and nearly all drunk."
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], August 19, 1864
Tells of fighting and prisoners taken. Answers queries in her letters. Discuesses peace prospects. Asks questions about the farm and friends and relatives. Tells her what to do. Rain at last--too much. Fighting down below him.
Letter from: Tink (another brother?), (Camp 139th (?)), to: John (brother), August 26, 1864
Are in reserve until called to fight Sherman. Asks John to send him some clothes.
Letter from: J. M. Moore [ by W. R. Singleton], (Macon), to: F. M. C[oker], August 27, 1864
Covering letter for a payment sent.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 5, 1864
Answers her questions in her letters. Has just heard the news of Hood's defeat--the evacuation of Atlanta.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 6, 1864
Encloses above letter. Love letter. Answers questions. Personal and family affairs.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 8, 1864
Encloses 2 above letters; was waiting to send them by hand, mails so uncertain. Love letter. Answers questions. All quiet.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 10, 1864
Lt. Duncan, "one of the best officers in the battn." killed; friend of theirs. Love letter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 14, 1864
Sees no chance of peace unless of Reconstruction that is going back. Personal letter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 15, 1864
Tells of his deck being broken open and robbed.
Letter from: W. B . C., (Mercier's Brigade, Cleburn's Division Army Tennessee.), to: F. M. C[oker], September 15, 1864
Discusses the progress of the war with gloomy prognostications as to the outcome. Account of fighting at Johnesboro--Diatribe against Mood. A very graphic letter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 18, 1864
Troop movements. Family affairs.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 20, 1864
Clem (Negro boy) came with the trunk--thanks for supplies. Views the future with alarm. Discusses finances at home and family affairs.
Letter from: J. M. Moore, (Augusta, Ga, Headquarters Conscript Ser.), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], September 24, 1864
Voucher for money due Lt. Coker.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 5, 1864
Fighting has been going on for 4 or 5 days. We are heavily outnumbered but have held fairly well. Our lines are long and necessarily weak in spots.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 13, 1864
His philosophy and his idea of his own character and personality. Hopes to come home sometime in winter. Family matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 15, 1864
A hurried note, a friend is leaving next day on furlough and will take letter and trunk to her.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: [no salutation] [wife] [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 18, 1864
Sent letter and trunk. Tells of enemy attacks. Discusses "Examiner" [Richmond newspaper]. Family affairs -- clothes and boots. Expecting a big battle.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 20, 1864
Personal and family affairs. Oct.21--has just received trunk and letter from her. Oct. 22--Clothes, food, etc. in trunk--also pictures.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], October 29, 1864
Personal affairs--about clothes, food, the farm, how she misses him, etc.
 
9Correspondence, 1864 October-December View online.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, to: F. M. C[oker], October 20, 1864
Pretty much the same as above.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 2, 1864
Family affairs, about clothes and shoes, news of friends and acquaintances, about food and taxes and finances in general.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 4, 1864
Essentially the same as above letter. A little about the fighting--some discussion of the election and prospects of peace. Cold and cloudy weather.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 10, 1864
Election--he is comfortable, with a snug tent--he wants to come home, quotes Burns. Family affairs. He is going to a wedding in the neighborhood.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 12, 1864
Family affairs. (business) Personal affairs. He is comfortable, has a warm room in a house. Describes the wedding he attended.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 16, 1864
Personal affairs. Discusses the progress of the war--Lincoln's abilities and lack of abilities of President.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 21, 1864
Family business matters. Discusses Sherman's campaign in Georgia.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 26, 1864
Almost all about Sherman's campaign and cutting off of communications. He hears rumours of Sherman's burning and hopes he does not go to Americus. He is terribly worried and can't get news from Georgia.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: [no salutation] [wife] [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], November 30, 1864
Personal. He doesn't see how the war can possibly last more than a few months. Hopes he can get a furlough for Christmas.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 2, 1864
Personal. Quotes Burns and Shakespeare, Says all the army is discussing the war in Georgia. Hopes South-Western Georgia will escape.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], December 6, 1864
Tells of what Sherman has taken from various people (relatives) and her plans should he [Sherman] come to Americus. She heard the battn. might be transferred to Georgia (continued on 7th and 8th of December--more of the same)
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 9, 1864
Hasn't heard from her in 20 days. No chance for a furlough. Gen. Lee has ordered all leaves suspended to officers and men going through or to Georgia--on account of Sherman.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 16, 1864
Hopes when Sherman is out of Georgia and roads are again open he can get a furlough. He thinks Will and Tink are in the trenches around Nashville. (continued on December 17---same)
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], December 21, 1864
Roads now open for travel through Georgia--will try for a furlough.
 
10Correspondence, 1865 View online.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 1, 1865
Back "home". Give detailed description of trip from Americus. February 2--Everything quiet in Petersburg--flags of truce nearly daily. Stephens, Hunter and Campbell passed through lines on way to "City of villainie and corruption to have a talk with King Abraham." Talks of family matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 5, 1865
Nothing to do--hopes for an early peace. Family matters.
Letter from: A. L. Cutts, (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], February 8, 1865
Tells of trip to Americus and other general news.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], February 9, 1865
Family matters
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 14, 1865
Very cold--he loves climate of Virginia though. Wants her to buy "blackings" for $10, send to him because he can sell it for $20. Coffee is $40 and sugar $15 to $20; flour $5 a pound and cornmeal $1.25. This letter is her valentine--Ten years ago he wrote her his first "ebullition of love".
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], February 15, 1865
Doubts that he'll receive letter because of communication conditions. Quite cold and her heart aches for their soldiers exposed to such weather. General family matters.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 15, 1865
Sent her and "examiner" containing details of the Peace talks "as given by Mass Abe and his vice parent [?] the Devil--alias William H. Seward. Other general news.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 17, 1865
Looks as though they will have Negro troops. General news
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus) , to: F. M. C[oker], February 18, 1865
Family news. Brown homespun selling for $10 a yard. Col. Cutts very sick at home--won't return to Virginia for 2 or 3 months, if at all.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 18, 1865
Much depressed as Yanks have captured Columbia S. C. He is speculating and says he hates to even in "this little way, but we must live." Quotes prices there. Encloses a $4 treasury note of Virginia issued during Revolution. Sherman seems to march unresisted.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker] (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 19
General news
Letter from: F. M. C[oker] (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 23, 1865
Getting no mail from the south and sending none. Beauregard must fall back from Sherman. Petersburg will no doubt be evacuated. Tells her what she must do if something happens to him.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], to: F. M. C[oker], February 21, 1865
Papers full of war speeches and resolutions. She tires of editos who would have everybody else fight. Col. Cutts still very sick. Family and business news.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], February 23, 1865
Prices of corn $15 a bushel, flour $2 a pound. Can get a pair of shoes made for $35. Family news--Charleston captured.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 25, 1865
Awaiting evacuation of the city. Cotton and tobacco are piled in field awaiting torch, hospitals are cleared and trains have been ordered in. General news.
Letter from: Susan Marshall, [at home], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], February 25, 1865
She is sending some wool to have a cape made, gives instructions.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 2, 1865
Petersburg still not evacuated. Communications have been cut off by Sherman. Sending a letter by friend.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], (Petersburg), to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 3, 1865
Congress killed the Negro bill and forces continually diminish. Tomorrow Abe Lincoln inaugurated for 2nd term.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], Petersburg, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 6, 1865
General news--tells of rumours of War. They have no authenic news as papers publish nothing.
Letter from: A. L. Cutts, (Americus), to: F. M. C[oker], March 17, 1864
He has been very ill. General news.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 17, 1865
Glad to hear that Sherman is coming from Georgia rather than towards her. Other general news.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], to: F. M. C[oker], March 18, 1865
Men once afain can go through with letters. News of family and friends.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], March 21, 1865
Have been expecting fight daily. Cheered over news that Johnston drove Sherman back. Reviews business details he's written in other letters that he fears she hasn't received. Says they still have good clothes and food.
 
11Correspondence, 1866, undated View online.
Letter from: Allen Rees, to: F. M. C[oker], September 8, 1866
Business letter.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], undated
[letter incomplete] He's giving her instructions about sending lard to him which he can sell for $2.50 a pound.
Letter from: W. B. C. C., to: F. M. C[oker], undated
Talks of Georgia being invaded in the fall and how Columbus, Atlanta, and Augusta should be fortified. [letter incomplete]
 
12Miscelleaneous View online.
Letter from: W. B. C. C., to: F. M. C[oker], undated
Lists his debts and the letter deals with business matters [letter uncomplete]
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], undated
A P. S. to a letter. General news.
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], undated
Last part of a letter--general news [incomplete]
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], undated
Things brighter now than a year ago. Confederates have had many victories. Other general news. [incomplete]
Letter from: F. M. C[oker], to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], undated
Talks of war and European intervention. Says tomorrow, according to Woodson and his mother, he will be 35 years old. Day after tomorrow it will be 11 months since Manassas. [incomplete]
Letter from: R. F. Byrd & Co., to: F. M. C[oker], undated
Bill and receipt of payment.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], Americus, to: F. M. C[oker], December 18, ?
His watch has been stolen. He'll soon be home.
Letter from: Reuben Arnold, to: F. M. C[oker], undated
Receipt of payment.
Letter from: Friend?, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], October 2, ?
Sallie is a Senior in school. The friend tells her of what she has been doing since her graduation, evidently the previous year.
Letter from: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], to: F. M. C[oker], April 14, ?
News of Family and friends.
Letter from: Annie of Bellevue, to: Sallie Alice Johnson [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], undated
A poem, "The Young Bride" suggested by the marriage of Johson. [Sallie Johnson became Mrs. F. M. Coker]
Letter from: Nelson Sizer, (New York) Phrenological character description of F. M. C., to: F. M. C[oker], July 20, ?
Letter from: Nelson Sizer, (New York) Phrenological character description of Mrs. Sallie Coker, to: S. C. [Sarah (Sallie) Alice Reid Coker], July 20, ?
Clipping from the Richmond "Enquirer". (Richmond), February 24, 1863
Newspaper clipping on Hagood's S. C. Brigade
Letter from: Pro. O. S. Fowler, (Atlanta) Phrenological character description of F. M. C., to: F. M. C[oker], January 16, 1879
Letter from: George C. Smith, A School merit certificate., to: F. M. C[oker], December 20, 1872
Letter from: Bailey and Davenport, (Americus) A bill